Recent Posts

Christmas Tree Safety Tips

12/6/2016 (Permalink)

Although Christmas tree fires are not common, when they do occur, they are more likely to be serious.

Picking the tree

  • Choose a tree with fresh, green needles that do not fall off when touched.

Placing the tree

  • Before placing the tree in the stand, cut 2" from the base of the trunk.
  • Make sure the tree is at least three feet away from any heat source, like fireplaces, radiators, candles, heat vents or lights.
  • Make sure the tree is not blocking an exit.
  • Add water to the tree stand. Be sure to add water daily.

Lighting the tree

  • Use lights that have the label of an independent testing laboratory. Some lights are only for indoor or outdoor use.
  • Replace any string of lights with worn or broken cords or loose bulb connections. Read manufacturer's instructions for number of light strands to connect. 
  • Never use lit candles to decorate the tree.
  • Always turn off Christmas tree lights before leaving home or going to bed.“

For more information, please continue reading at: http://www.nfpa.org/news-and-research/fire-statistics-and-reports/fire-statistics/fire-causes/holiday/christmas-tree-and-holiday-lights

SERVPRO of Licking County at 740-587-0938….here to help! Let our professional team do the cleanup with the proper procedures to keep you, your home or company safe.

June is National Safety Month-Carbon Monoxide

6/24/2016 (Permalink)

Here a few tips on how to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning copied directly from:http://safetytoolboxtopics.com/General/carbon-monoxide-poisoning-kills-two.html

·       " Have your heating system, water heater and any other gas, oil, or coal burning appliances serviced by a qualified technician every year.

·        Do not use portable flameless chemical heaters (catalytic) indoors. Although these heaters don't have a flame, they burn gas and can cause CO to build up inside your home, cabin, or camper.

·        If you smell an odor from your gas refrigerator's cooling unit have an expert service it. An odor from the cooling unit of your gas refrigerator can mean you have a defect in the cooling unit. It could also be giving off CO.

·        When purchasing gas equipment, buy only equipment carrying the seal of a national testing agency, such as the American Gas Association or Underwriters' Laboratories.

·        Install a battery-operated CO detector in your home and check or replace the battery when you change the time on your clocks each spring and fall."

Please click the source link provided above to continue reading and learning!

This information was copied from the above link as a source of information and was not written by SERVPRO of Licking County.

SERVPRO of Licking County 740-587-0938...Here to help

June is National Safety Month- Fire Escape Tips

6/23/2016 (Permalink)

Having a good plan in place can save your life, your families and your pets!

Here are a few fire escape tips copied directly from the link provided.  Please click the link to find more tips and information as this is just a snippet of the online article to get you started:https://www.usfa.fema.gov/downloads/fief/up_in_smoke_parents_brochure.pdf

·         “You have a fire escape plan for your home.

·         You know two ways out of every room.

·         You know the best way to take your baby outside if there is a fire.

·         You practice the plan with everyone who lives in your home at least twice a year.

·         You have a meeting place outside.

·         Everyone knows how to call 9-1-1 from outside to report a fire.”

Please click the link above to read more about fire safety.

Learn more by visiting: www.usfa.fema.gov

SERVPRO of Licking County 740-587-0938...Here to help! 

June is National Safety Month- Electronic Cigarettes

6/21/2016 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Licking County 740-587-0938...Here to help! 

When smoking you have to be sure to follow safety procedures to prevent fires.  Did you know that electronic cigarettes can cause fires?  According to the NFPA website (see source link below):

“Fires have occurred while e-cigarettes were being used, the battery was being charged, or the device was being transported. Battery failures have led to small explosions. Never leave charging e-cigarettes unattended. E-cigarettes should be used with caution.”

Also:

“The risk of dying in a home structure fire caused by smoking materials rises with age.  One out of four fatal victims of smoking-material fires is not the smoker whose cigarette started the fire.”

Sources: “Reproduced from NFPA’s website, http://www.nfpa.org/public-education/resources/safety-tip-sheets. ©2016 NFPA.”  

This information was copied from the above link as a source of information and was not written by SERVPRO of Licking County.

June is National Safety Month-Smoke Alarms

6/17/2016 (Permalink)

General June is National Safety Month-Smoke Alarms Photo Source: https://www.amazon.com/Kidde-Hardwire-Ionization-Detector-Battery/dp/B001XQ5VHW

Every home and business should have working smoke alarms.  Batteries need to be changed at least twice a year.  A good time to change batteries is in the fall and spring when changing our clocks.

The following tips were provided by and copied directly from:http://www.nfpa.org/public-education/by-topic/smoke-alarms

 (Source: http://www.nfpa.org/education ©NFPA 2016http://www.nfpa.org/public-education/resources/safety-tip-sheets). 

Please click on the link to continue reading for more tips!

·         Install smoke alarms inside and outside each bedroom and sleeping area.

·         Install alarms on every level of the home. Install alarms in the basement.

·         Large homes may need extra smoke alarms.

·         It is best to use interconnected smoke alarms. When one smoke alarm sounds they all sound.

·         Test all smoke alarms at least once a month. Press the test button to be sure the alarm is working.

This information was copied from the above link as a source of information and was not written by SERVPRO of Licking County.

SERVPRO of Licking County 740-587-0938...Here to help

June is National Safety Month- Summer Safety

6/16/2016 (Permalink)

Summer is a time for vacations, fun, and very hot weather. There are also lots of weather hazards.

The following was copied directly from online to get you started reading the article:

http://www.nws.noaa.gov/com/weatherreadynation/summer_safety.html#.VOdUW_nF9u3

"Being prepared means learning about summer weather and water hazards such as hurricanes, heat, lightning, rip currents, air quality, tsunamis and wildfires. Here’s what you need to know:

  • The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 through November 30. Hurricane hazards come in many forms, including storm surge, heavy rainfall, inland flooding, high winds, tornadoes, and rip currents.
  • Since 2003, 43 states within the continental United States have come under a tornado watch; 49 states have come under severe thunderstorm watches; and lightning strikes occur in every state.
  • Heat waves are common across the country during the summer. They are dangerous because the human body cannot cool itself properly when exposed to an extreme combination of heat and humidity.
  • In 2015, there were 26 lightning fatalities.
  • The United States Lifesaving Association estimates that more than 100 people each year die in the surf zone waters of the U.S. and that rip currents cause the majority of those fatalities. Rip currents are just one of many beach hazards.
  • Wildfires kill 30 people, destroy 2,800 homes and burn more than 7 million acres, roughly the size of the state of Massachusetts, on average, per year.
  • Flash flooding is the number one killer associated with severe weather." 

Please click the link above to read more of the onlilne article and tips.

This information was copied from the above link as a source of information and was not written by SERVPRO of Licking County. 

SERVPRO of Licking County 740-587-0938...Here to help! 

June is National Safety Month- Creating a Safety Management Program

6/15/2016 (Permalink)

There are many things that can be done to create a safe workplace program. Travelers Insurance online wrote an article with lots of great tips.

The following portion was copied directly from: https://www.travelers.com/resources/workplace-safety/how-to-create-a-safety-management-program.aspx

  1. Demonstrate management involvement – Management must lead by example. A visible demonstration that you embrace a safety culture is imperative to its success. Provide the essential time, budget and resources to create and support a safety program.
  2. Communicate your safety plan clearly – Your safety plan must be published and available to all employees. Reminders and updates should be timely and effective. Allow employees to contribute their suggestions to making the workplace safer.
  3. Get everyone involved – A safety program is likely to be more effective when employees at all levels are involved. Standardized policies should outline responsibilities and accountability for all employees. Safety goals can become part of job descriptions and employee reviews. Safety committees can help ensure that safety practices are understood and reinforced throughout the company. Positive reinforcement of safe behaviors can be an effective way to help build the desired culture.
  4. Train your employees to work safely – Safety training should begin from the moment an employee is hired. Ongoing training is also essential to creating a safety culture.
  5. Review, revise, improve – A safety program should be dynamic, especially since most business environments continue to evolve. An effective safety program should be flexible enough to adjust to changes. Regularly review, evaluate and identify risks that could affect safety, and make the changes necessary to keep your workplace safe."

Please click the link above to read more tips! 

This information was copied from the above link as a source of information and was not written by SERVPRO of Licking County. 

SERVPRO of Licking County 740-587-0938...Here to help! 

June is National Safety Month- Safety in the Workplace

6/14/2016 (Permalink)

There are many things that can be done to create a safe workplace culture. Travelers Insurance online wrote an article with lots of information.

The following was copied directly from: https://www.travelers.com/resources/workplace-safety/creating-a-safety-culture-in-the-workplace.aspx

"The following four steps can serve as a starting point in driving safety across your business.

1. Evaluate risks. To understand how to create a safer workplace, you must first understand the risks you face every day. Each task and associated risk should be properly evaluated, and safety-based changes should be considered.

  • Analyze past incidents and near misses.Understand that past incidents can help you identify root causes and identify risks and exposures that threaten the safety of your employees and the success of your business.
  • Identify the risks before they result in loss. Review your work policies and procedures, buildings and equipment, employee work practices and behaviors and geographic location to determine if there are opportunities to prevent or mitigate loss. And hold people accountable to the practices.
  • 2. Design a plan to keep safe. A good plan is the best place to start, but it is only the beginning. Once you have a plan, you must act to eliminate or minimize risk.

  • Get commitment. Your management team should be committed to a safety culture from the beginning.
  • Stay focused. Keep focused on the risks and exposures identified during your evaluation.
  • Prioritize your efforts. Focus on the risks that pose the greatest threat. You should consider frequency and severity of the loss potential, and/or the opportunity to prevent or mitigate risks.
  • Identify solutions and resources.Your solutions can vary from implementing engineering controls to creating administrative policies and procedures. These can help create positive changes in safety attitude, commitment and culture.
  • 3. Implement your plan. Implementation entails communication of the plan and its details, training, regularly scheduled practice and drills, and ongoing review. A thorough plan will cover a number of potential risk areas, including buildings and equipment, the environment, employees, customers and vendors.

  • Communicate and train - the real test of a safety program and culture is not what is written down on paper, but rather how well it actually works. How well your plan works is often dependent on what your employees know and what they do at the time of an incident.
  • 4. Monitor, evaluate and improve your plan. As your business environment changes, so should your safety program. Regularly test your plan to determine if it fits the changing business environment and reflects changing accountabilities.

  • Monitor the plan and collect feedback to determine the effectiveness of the plan.
  • Regularly compare your safety performance against the plan’s expectations.
  • Make adjustments when necessary.
  • Recognize success. Be sure to communicate and celebrate your safety successes.”
  •  Please click the link above to read more tips! 

    This information was copied from the above link as a source of information and was not written by SERVPRO of Licking County. 

    SERVPRO of Licking County 740-587-0938...Here to help! 

    June is National Safety Month- Treating Burns

    6/10/2016 (Permalink)

    The following was copied directly from: http://www.nsc.org/NSCDocuments_Advocacy/Fact%20Sheets/Treating-Burns.pdf

    "Treatment for burns depends on the type, severity and size.

    Treatment for minor burns – first and second degree burns no larger than 3 inches in diameter 

    1. Cool the burn. Hold under cold running tap water until the area is free from pain even after removal from the water. If this is not possible cool with a cold compress. 2. Cover the burn with a sterile nonstick dressing and bandage. Don’t use fluffy cotton or other material that may stick to or get lint in the wound. Wrap the bandage loosely to avoid putting pressure on burned skin. Bandaging reduces pain, protects blistered skin, and helps prevent infection. 3. Take an over-the-counter pain reliever. Aspirin, Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, etc.), naproxen (Aleve) or acetaminophen (Tylenol, etc). Use caution when giving pain relievers to children or teenagers. Although aspirin is approved for use in children older than 2 years, children and teens recovering from chickenpox or flu-like symptoms should never take aspirin." 

    This information was copied from the above link as a source of information and was not written by SERVPRO of Licking County.

    Please click the link above to read more tips! 

    SERVPRO of Licking County 740-587-0938...Here to help! 

    June is National Safety Month- Ladder Safety

    6/9/2016 (Permalink)

    The following was copied directly from: http://www.nsc.org/NSCDocuments_Advocacy/Fact%20Sheets/Slips-Trips-and-Falls.pdf

    “· Always keep at least three points of contact with the ladder (i.e. two hands and one foot or two feet and one hand) · Place the base on a firm, solid surface · A straight or extension ladder should be placed 1 foot away from the surface it rests against for every 4 feet of ladder height · When you climb, always face the ladder and grip the rungs, not the side rails · Climb down a ladder one rung at a time · Do not climb with tools in hand – use a tool belt· Keep your body between the ladder side rails when climbing · Do not lean or overreach – reposition the ladder closer to the work instead · Tie down a ladder when using it outdoors and do not use it in windy or inclement weather.”

    This information was copied from the above link as a source of information and was not written by SERVPRO of Licking County.

    Please click the link above to read more tips! 

    SERVPRO of Licking County 740-587-0938...Here to help!